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Drag link safety wire clips

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  • Drag link safety wire clips

    The original retaining clips for the plug ends on both sides the drag link there.

    ​the clip gets placed in the two opposing holes with the arc facing away from the grease zirk, then just rotated downward until it's ​​​​​laying down flat.

    Just wanted to make sure I understand how they engage.
    and that they are just held in by there own spring tension as you roll them down.

  • #2
    On mine, one of them (or maybe both) seemed to almost snap in place around the grease zerk. In fact, when I went to remove them a few months ago, I had a hard time with one of them because it was held in place by the grease zerk. I had to get a dental pick and really pull on it to get it loose. I don't remember the other end being as tough to get out. When I put it all back together, I laid down the clips around the zerk and did my best to "snap" them clips back in place, in hopes it would be harder for them to come out on their own. I doubt they would come out on their own, though, as they sort of spring into place in the two opposing holes, as you noted.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by polaris400cc View Post
      The original retaining clips for the plug ends on both sides the drag link there.

      ​the clip gets placed in the two opposing holes with the arc facing away from the grease zirk, then just rotated downward until it's ​​​​​laying down flat.

      Just wanted to make sure I understand how they engage.
      and that they are just held in by there own spring tension as you roll them down.
      Usually I have to get in there with a small punch and drive the wire between the edge of the grease fitting and the inside of the cap. There isn't a lot of tension on that clip itself. Other times i have had to make the loop shallower once removed because it isn't quite long enough to engage both opposing holes securely.

      Does this make sense?

      1967 W200.aka.Hank
      1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
      2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

      Life is easier in a lower gear.

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      • #4
        Yes Makes sense. Mine didn't seem to have much resistance when rolling it down to its final position. But enough that i dont see how it would vibrate itself back up and out. Just wanted to see what others opinions were. Its a long winter of hibernation. Gives me too much time to think about it.

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        • #5
          Question guys. I'm getting ready to disasemble the drag link on my 54. In looking at the ends through the dirt and grease, I don't see these "clips". There are the larger cotter pins in the ends. After I remove the cotter pins, I'll get in there with a pick to see if the clips are there. Once I have those pins and clips, if present, removed, should the remaining spacers and springs come out easily or is there a trick to dissasembly? Thanks for your help, Don

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          • #6
            Don

            The previous owner may of replaced the clips with cotter pins, my 49 only has one set of holes at each end for the wire clips. I have re-built mine twice (since I noticed after rebuilding it the first time and mounting it that the key-way for the ball at pitman arm was worn so I needed to replace the drag link itself). Everything inside just falls out (you may need to dig a bit with the old grease in there) and re-assembly is a breese. If you do use the wire clips (wire 2-02-45 in diagram), install them prior to installing the zirk fittings, makes install easy.

            Drag link.jpg

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            • #7
              Thanks for the insight Tex.

              FYI, I got the drag link apart ,but it was different on mine. Once I pulled the cotter pins and cleaned the scum away, both ends of the drag link on mine had "notches" on the interior plugs. I noticed threading in these notches, so I removed the grease fittings so I could get into the ends easier. I then ground a flat washer flat on two sides so it would fit in the ends of the tube and had to "screw" the end plugs out. Once I had the end plugs out, the rest of the spacers and springs came out easily. I'm guessing the pitman arm on mine just may be an aftermarket one?

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              • #8
                I welded a small piece of flat iron to the end of a nut that fit into the notches of the threaded end plugs. This made it easy to just use a wrench or socket to remove and them although you do not need to torque them for reinstallation, just enough pressure to start compression on the springs. Why do you believe your pitman arm is aftermarket? got a pic of arm and drag link?

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                • #9
                  I'll have to go back through my pictures and see what I can find. If not, I'll take a few when I get back down in the garage.

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                  • #10
                    Dont remember the size of the socket I used, but i fount one that just fit inside the drag link, then used a cutoff wheel and made a 2 tooth socket out of it. Like the style that you use to disassemble a 80's style 3/4 ton front end. And then it even allows you to assemble and disassemble without removing the grease zirk fitting

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