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The restoration of my 69 Power Wagon

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  • #16
    Hi,
    Been very quiet here, but there has been some progress after all. The engine is nearly finished. Need to build a new engine stand so that I can take it off its current engine stand for mounting flywheel and clutch housing.
    I also concluded that the frame needed to come apart for thorough cleaning and sandblasting.
    all parts has for the frame has been disassembled, cleaned with StripAll or sandblasted. They have received some layers with Zinga (zink that can be applied as a paint).
    I am now ready to reassemble the frame, got rivets from VPW so all is set for some fun J

    For some reason i am no allowed to save attatchements?!

    Comment


    • #17
      WOW, that's a lot of work on the frame. Keep up the progress.
      I drive a DODGE, not a ram!

      Thanks,
      Will
      WAWII.com

      1946 WDX Power Wagon - "Missouri Mule"
      1953 M37 - "Frankenstein"
      1993 Jeep YJ - "Will Power"
      1984 Dodge Ramcharger - "2014 Ramcharger"
      2006 3500 DRW 4WD Mega Cab - "Power Wagon Hauler"

      Comment


      • #18

        So her's some pictures of the work so far:


        Frame_rear.jpg Uten navn.jpg Frame1.jpg Frame2.jpg Innerframe.jpg image_13686.jpg

        edit: made pic larger.

        Comment


        • #19
          Hi, I'm trying to find out if the windshield frame from a Dodge WC 54 fit's the power wagon cab, any one tried or know for shure?

          Comment


          • #20
            Hi Christian, I'm wondering what year your engine block is...original to your WC?

            cd
            1949 B-1 PW (Gus)
            1955 C-3 PW (Woodrow)
            2001 Dodge 2500 (Dish...formerly Maney's Mopar)
            1978 Suzuki GS1000EC (fulfills the need...the need for speed)
            1954 Ford 860 tractor
            1966 Chrysler LS 16 sailboat (as yet un-named)
            UVA UVAM VIVENDO VARIA FITS

            Comment


            • #21
              Hi Dave, i have a 69 Dodge Power Wagon, not a WC. I'm not shure, but think it's original to the PW, so i
              assume it's a 69 251.

              Comment


              • Matthew Welcher PWA
                Matthew Welcher PWA commented
                Editing a comment
                Christian, looking at your other pictures and the windshield that is in your cab, Is the cab that was on your frame the cab you are going to use? If so can I see a few other close ups of that? The one picture I saw, It appeared your cab used like a B series 2wd windshield.

              • ChristianT
                ChristianT commented
                Editing a comment
                Hi Matthew, did not see this comment untill now.
                I think the cab is original to the frame, ID tag on cab matches number on frame.
                This truck was originally delivered to the Danish army, i'v been told that the windshield frame often rusted out and that the Danish Army made some kind of replacement frame. This frame is also gone. one of the previous owners has just attached the windows with silicone, so no frame.
                Think i have some close up pic's, i'll post them later to day.

                C

            • #22
              Originally posted by ChristianT View Post
              Hi, I'm trying to find out if the windshield frame from a Dodge WC 54 fit's the power wagon cab, any one tried or know for shure?
              Christian, The windshield frame from the WC54 will fit the closed cab Power Wagon cab. Some Of the differences can be if it uses the flat swing out arms and a pull ring on the bottom. Versus the crank out windshield regulator with the T handle. They can be converted with enough work and patience. The overall dimension and size along with the upper windshield bracket hinges are the exact same.
              1967 W200.aka.Hank
              1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
              2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

              Life is easier in a lower gear.

              Comment


              • #23
                My bad. I got tripped up on the windshield frame question. I noticed a detail on l your block that is absent from earlier blocks. 251 makes sense.

                As to the windshield frame question, the only difference ,that I am aware of between your frame and that from the WC is the maner inbwhich they are operated.

                While the civilian uses a center dash crank mechanism, the WC uses a two bracket assemblies, one on each A-pillar. So you may need to drill a couple of new holes in the lower frame to anchor your crank tape, and weld closed the holes used for the WC hardware before installing any glass.

                cd
                1949 B-1 PW (Gus)
                1955 C-3 PW (Woodrow)
                2001 Dodge 2500 (Dish...formerly Maney's Mopar)
                1978 Suzuki GS1000EC (fulfills the need...the need for speed)
                1954 Ford 860 tractor
                1966 Chrysler LS 16 sailboat (as yet un-named)
                UVA UVAM VIVENDO VARIA FITS

                Comment


                • #24
                  Guess I was a minute late, lol
                  1949 B-1 PW (Gus)
                  1955 C-3 PW (Woodrow)
                  2001 Dodge 2500 (Dish...formerly Maney's Mopar)
                  1978 Suzuki GS1000EC (fulfills the need...the need for speed)
                  1954 Ford 860 tractor
                  1966 Chrysler LS 16 sailboat (as yet un-named)
                  UVA UVAM VIVENDO VARIA FITS

                  Comment


                  • #25
                    Thank you both for thorough explanation :)
                    This gives me some more hope finding a windshield frame locally. If i don't find any i have to order inn one of those reproduced frames, who looks very nice by the way, but with shipping to Norway and taxes on topp of that it get's a bit pricy :/ .

                    Comment


                    • Matthew Welcher PWA
                      Matthew Welcher PWA commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Anytime! Thank you for sharing your work and build with all of us. Keep the pictures and questions coming!

                  • #26
                    Originally posted by Matthew Welcher PWA View Post

                    Christian, looking at your other pictures and the windshield that is in your cab, Is the cab that was on your frame the cab you are going to use? If so can I see a few other close ups of that? The one picture I saw, It appeared your cab used like a B series 2wd windshield.
                    This is how the windshield is today.
                    Yes, I think the cab is original to the frame, ID tag on cab matches number on frame.

                    Windshield.jpg windshield2.jpg

                    Comment


                    • Matthew Welcher PWA
                      Matthew Welcher PWA commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Ok! At first when I saw the pictures it appeared like it had a B series 2wd glass in it. Now with the closer pictures I can see what you are talking about.
                      I believe that there maybe suppliers on your side of the pond that could help you locate one that could be made to work.
                      Wildenberg possibly?

                  • #27
                    Hi,
                    it’s in the middle of the winter here in Norway and with -10 to -15 degree C (5 -14F) it's no pleasure to work in a none heated garage.
                    But a big job lays ahead.. Riveting the frame back to getter. At first the idea was to heat the rivet red hot, and then use a chisel with an inverted dome drilled in to it, and hit it with a hammer. It worked but took forever, because we had to re heat the rivet to finish. This method is out of the question.
                    Well long story short, i started checking those big air hammers the pro's use, but they are expensive and i would need an even larger compressor than i have now. We (My dad and I) ended up welding the tool to an old SDS max drillbit and attached it to a big Makita hammerdrill, and another tool to a smaller hammer drill for use on the opposite side. The Makita delivers 20J blows, and the smaller one 5J.
                    Yesterday we manned up and had a shot at it. Well, it worked like a charm. The actual hammer process took about 5-10 seconds vs. several minutes manually.


                    We will probably finish the riveting process next week, the rest of this week is packed with day job work.

                    These two rivets were done manually. Dont have a pic of the tools or the process yet.
                    Rivet.jpg

                    Comment


                    • #28
                      Some time since last post, but a great deal has been done. The riveting process turned out pretty good and where done over a couple of afternoons. The frame is now home in my garage, it is painted and i have started mounting brackets to it.
                      Next on the to do list is sandblasting leaf springs and axles. One axle is blasted and primed with Zinga. Rear leaf springs is sandblasted and soon ready for primer.
                      How do you treat the springs after sandblasting? Are there much point in painting in between the spring, maybe a thin coat of some sort of primer?

                      Riveting tool:
                      20210217_134029.jpg


                      Frame.JPG
                      Painted:
                      20210601_234508.jpg

                      Axle.JPG

                      Axle after.JPG

                      Comment


                      • Doc Dave
                        Doc Dave commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Well done!

                        What I did is to take the spring leaves apart, since they were rusted to each other, and so I felt they would not “work” properly. I then blasted the leaves and painted them in epoxy primer. Next I assembled them and then paInted the completed spring pack with black hardened enamel paint, after lightly scuffing the exposed primer.
                        I’ve read that one should not put grease between the leaves because it holds dirt or grit. I did not know that when I did mine and I put a very thin layer of marine grease between the leaves.
                        VPW sells a Teflon (?) strip a person could place between the leaves if desired, to reduce squeaking or ensure they don’t rust together which may or may not be an issue.
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