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Underseat heat hose routing

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  • Underseat heat hose routing

    I'm sure over the years things get moved around during maintenance so I'm wondering if anyone has pics of the right way to route under seat heat on a early 60s W200. After sliding under the truck I noticed that the drive shaft has hit the two layers of hose at least once cutting completely through the outer layer of hose and the bundled up hose causes the transfer case levers to bind. I can't imagine that it's routed correctly given the fact that cutting up a coolant line is one of those things you normally try to avoid.

  • #2
    What specific truck do you have, and can you post pictures of the routing and hoses? Is it an Ambulance by chance?
    1967 W200.aka.Hank
    1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
    2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

    Life is easier in a lower gear.

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    • #3
      1963 W-200, not an ambulance. I can slide back under and start taking pics but thought maybe someone had diagrams of the original routing. The heater is under the driver's seat and the hoses run from the water pump along the driver's side frame rail to the heater then from the heater over the drive shaft between the transmission and transfer case. Right there is where I think things went wrong since the hose has clearly come in contact with the driveshaft at some point. I could see the binding against the transfer case linkages being an acceptable risk but exposed where the drive shaft can take big bites out of it just doesn't seem right.

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      • #4
        I have not seen an under seat mounted heater on one of these truck. I am guessing it is an aftermarket installation from the previous owner. But it could be something I have never seen also.
        1967 W200.aka.Hank
        1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
        2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

        Life is easier in a lower gear.

        Comment


        • #5
          Here you go, from the heater core, along the passenger side, mixed up with the transfer case levers, over the drive shaft with a hole worn through one layer of hose and into the second. Over the driver's side frame, into the under seat heater, out of the under seat heater, back to the engine bay by way of the frame rail, up and into the water pump. Please ignore the wood cab mount, that's on the top of the priority list as soon as the new floor pans are delivered.
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          • #6
            And is this a Crewcab truck? That looks very similar to the hose routing on a W200 Ambulance. Very interesting.
            1967 W200.aka.Hank
            1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
            2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

            Life is easier in a lower gear.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes, crew cab, pickup bed. It's former Air Force so maybe the parts were taken from an ambulance on base somewhere along the line.

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              • #8
                Thats very possible, I will take a look tomorrow as I have time and compare it.
                1967 W200.aka.Hank
                1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
                2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

                Life is easier in a lower gear.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't know about the routing of the hoses. Just thought I would post this optional W200 heater page in the factory service manual I found a while back. Came out of an early 60s book.

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                  • #10
                    So this could be a factory option, very interesting.
                    thank you for sharing this.
                    1967 W200.aka.Hank
                    1946 WDX.aka.Shorty
                    2012 Ram 2500 PowerWagon.aka Ollie

                    Life is easier in a lower gear.

                    Comment

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